Premature Baby Development



Premature Baby Development

Having a baby with preterm birth must be a wedge for some parents. They will be concerned with the stages of infant development. The problem is some babies do not get developmental stages of premature babies born as normal. Although the baby’s development cannot be equated or enforced, we will guide you to understand your premature baby’s development.

As a guide, you have to remember your baby is born too early. If they were born two months early, it is not surprising taking into account that their progress will be two months later. This is because of their adaptability should also be counted. Some premature babies will develop age’s maximum of two years and will be in harmony with the growth of children in general.

As a parent, you should be able to stimulate and support the development of your baby’s premature. The importance of your support, doctors, therapists and teachers will maximize the capabilities of their development both physically and mentally. Do not worry too much, but many are doing creative stimulation to maximize your premature baby’s development.

Premature baby’s stage development:

Ages 2 month (8 week)

Motor

  • Keep Busy moving their hands and legs
  • You will find they can open their hands
  • When they on prone position, they will move up heads
  • Trying to move their heads
  • They can hold with their hand

Language

  • Have a response in sounds
  • Can speak “aahh” or “oohh”
  • Makes attention with crying

Activities

  • They can see, and their eye can follow movements
  • Cries are different based on their needs

Social/Emotional

  • Can laugh, smile or makes eye contact
  • Knowing her mother or father

Ages 4 Months (16 Weeks)

Motor

  • Their hands can reach their hats or mouth
  • When they on prone position, they will move up heads and pushed with arms
  • Looking for reach moving object
  • Starting to crawl

Language

  • Looking for voices
  • Start chatters and laugh

Activities

  • Reach moving objects
  • Biting everything that they holds
  • Knowing a toy

Social/Emotional

  • More active with parents and nanny
  • Be more playful with new kind objects
  • Looking for they own comfort

Ages 6 Months

Motor

  • Feet are strong enough to stands
  • Trying to sits
  • Moving objects they hold
  • Holds with two hands
  • Holds 2 thing on each hands
  • Rolls their body on side

Language

  • Knowing when we called their name
  • Chattered with new sounds like “da”, “ga”, “ba”, “ka”

Activities

  • Knowing different toys
  • Looking new object in their sight

Social/Emotional

  • Build some awareness
  • Noticing their family
  • Knowing strangers
  • Be more expressive

Ages 9 Months

Motor

  • Can pick small thing with fingers
  • Move smoothly
  • Trying stand by them self

Language

  • Understand some words
  • Chattering with combinations voice
  • Copying another person talks

Activities

  • Be more curious at any objects
  • Can play with their dish and bottles
  • Grasp on her toys

Social/Emotional

  • Claps and laughs
  • Be more aware

Ages 12 Months

Motor

  • Can stand by them self
  • Makes their first steps
  • Plays with book pages
  • Fill in the container

Language

  • Combine move and sounds at the same time
  • Recognize prohibition
  • calling “mama” or “dada” for their mom and dad
  • Spelling the same words
  • Give you asked things

Activities

  • Can eats by their self
  • Make their clothes

Social/Emotional

  • More close with parents
  • Make friends with the same age

Ages 15 Months

Motor

  • Walks
  • Climbs

Language

  • Learn words
  • Asks for their needs with words
  • Shows what they want

Activities

  • Eat by themselves with proper tools

Social/Emotional

  • Make kiss to others
  • Can say “hi” to others
  • Pay attentions to talks

Ages 18 Months

Motor

  • Do Scribbles
  • Walks and run
  • Kicking toys
  • Pulls bug toys

Language

  • Doing simple directions
  • Spells an increasing number
  • Points to their body parts

Activities

  • Can eats, but still messy
  • Make a drama when play games

Social/Emotional

  • Can refuse something with say no
  • Can play by their self

Ages 24-30 Months

Motor

  • Scribbles and draw lines
  • Like to run
  • Walks on stairs
  • Stands on one foot
  • Turn a page book

Language

  • Talks in 2-3 word
  • Follows instructions

Activities

  • Reads books and looking at pictures
  • turning knob doors
  • Can Washes and dries hands
  • Eats well

Social/Emotional

  • Helps with simple task
  • Responds prohibitions by stopping

Ages 30-36 Months

Motor

  • Plays tricycle
  • Learn use scissors
  • Draws circle
  • Jumps and balances on one foot

Language

  • Talks more clearly
  • Understands prepositions
  • Combines sentences

Activities of Daily Living

  • Fully toilet trained
  • Gets dressed

Social/Emotional

  • Gives order to other children
  • Plays a role in drama games

Ages 36 Months

Motor

  • Hops with one foot
  • Cuts using scissors

Language

  • Identifies colors
  • Tells concept of size, shape, number
  • Counts objects when asked “how many?”

Activities

  • Washes face
  • Dresses and undresses

Social/Emotional

  • Plays with less conflict and supervision
  • Drama play is more developed

Ages 48 Months

Motor

  • Hops by one foot repeatedly
  • Skips and running
  • Draws pictures
  • Draws a person with 3 body parts details

Language

  • Follows simple instructions
  • Reads letters
  • Speaks understandable sentences
  • Telling their stories

Activities

  • Makes dress with buttons
  • More careful when crossing street

Social/Emotional

  • Be more careful with younger children
  • Follows rules in board or card games

Ages 60 Months

Motor

  • Swings by their self
  • Tells their first name

Language

  • Describe familiar words
  • Well Spelled alphabet

Activities

  • Best toilet doing expert

Social/Emotional

  • Shows leadership
  • Plays with role of dress-up and make-believe

In The Early Days of School

During the school, some children born prematurely will show some indication that previously invisible. They will have different developments with other normal children. Diseases associated with poor physical condition would hamper their activities. Some others are emotionally unstable and poor intellectual development. This is what it should be realized that preterm children with conditions do require more stimulation and medical attention. Although many questions, however convinced that older people will could find the best way with teacher, therapists and doctor.

The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.


Posted in Preemie
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